Week Twenty-Seven 21/7/19 - 27/7/19

Coal Crisis in Britain

From Evening Herald, 21st July 1919

MINES FLOODED

NAVAL MEN RUSHED TO MAN THE PUMPS

GRAVE SITUATION

WHEN THE PRIME MINISTER WAS ASKED IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS TO-DAY WHETHER THE MINES IN YORKSHIRE ARE BEING FLOODED , HE SAID A DISPUTE WAS GOING ON, BUT THE LAST 24 HOURS HAD WITNESSED A GRAVE AND UNPRECEDENTED DEVELOPMENT IN THE DISPUTE. ALREADY 3 MINES WERE FLOODED, AND 12 MORE WOULD BE IN A DAY OR TWO. MEN HAD BEEN SENT FROM THE FLEET TO PUMP THE MINES. THE GOVERNMENT WOULD TAKE EVERY MEANS TO SAVE THE MINES AND ACOORD EVERY PROTECTION TO THOSE HELPING.

From Evening Herald, 23rd July 1919

COAL STRIKE SPREADING

ALL RAILWAY TRANSPORT SERIOUSLY AFFECTED PASSENGER SERVICES LIMITED UNPRECEDENTED SITUATION UNDER REVIEW

In Mansfield coal field, Nottingham, another ten to twelve thousand men this morning laid down their tools, bringing the total number now out to considerably over 20,000. The Exchange Telegraph Company's Barnsley correspondent says no further development has taken place throughout the Yorkshire coalfields, and an early settlement cannot at the moment be foreseen. There are dangers of wider complications still. Everything is quiet. alone of the many large pits where pumping was not-carried on, it has now been resurfaced in one case will their own men and in the other case with assistance of a party of naval men. Other large collieries not affected by pumping operations are at a complete standstill, and no ventilation machinery whatever has been working.

SOUTH AFRICAN LEADER SPEAKS OUT ON IRISH QUESTION AND URGES RESOLUTION

From Drogheda Independent, 26th July 1919

THE ALTERNATIVES 

JUSTICE FOR IRELAND, OR THE END OF THE EMPIRE 

SMUTS’ ADVICE TO BRITAIN 

“APPLY SAME PRINCIPLES IN IRELAND AS BOHEMIA”

In a farewell message to the British people before sailing on Thursday for South Africa, General Smuts said the Irish question had became a chronic wound , the septic effects of which were spreading to the whole British system, and through its influence on America it was now beginning to poison their most vital foreign relations.

"Unless the Irish question, is settled on the great principles which form the basis of this Empire," he said, "this Empire would cease to exist." The statesmen who had settled racial problems such as that of Bohemia should not shrink from applying the same medicine to the Irish problem.

The Australian Senate is to be asked to vote on a resolution urging the immediate granting' of full self-government, preferably on Dominion lines.

THE VITAL QUESTION. BOER STATESMAN URGES IRISH SETTLEMENT.

General Smuts, in a farewell message, urged strongly the immediate settlement of the Irish question; ' Referring to the Dominions, he said: "The successful launching of her former Colonies among the nations of the world, while they remain members of an inner Britannic circle, will ever rank as one of the most outstanding achievements of British political genius.

"There still remained the equally important task of properly locating the great dependencies like India and Egypt in a free, democratic British League. "No time should be lost, and it was a task to be approached with an open mind and with the fixed determination here, too, to realise those principles of freedom and self-government without which this Empire could not continue to exist.

"MOST PRESSING OF ALL."

Most pressing of all constitutional problems is the Irish' question. It has become a chronic wound, the septic effects of which are spreading to our whole system, and through its influence on America it is now beginning to poison our most vital foreign relations. Unless the Irish question is settled on those great principles which form the basis of this Empire, this Empire must cease to exist. Irishmen cannot "be made the fact that #i agree may have been a good reason for not forcing on a solution during the war, but now, after Peace has been signed, the question should be boldly grappled with.

MINORITIES: GERMAN AND "ULSTER."

Our statesmen have just come back from Paris, where they have dealt with racial problems like that of Ireland and in every way as difficult as the Irish problem.

They may not shrink from applying to Ireland the same medicine, that they have applied to Bohemia and many another part of Europe.'

Thanking the British people for their kindness to him, General Smuts said they had not hesitated to honour and trust one who was once their enemy. "My own case is a striking instance of how an enemy of today may be a friend and comrade to-morrow, and should in these difficult days make all of us realise how important it is to practise tolerance and restraint, in the expression of our feelings towards those who were yesterday our bitter enemies.

From Nenagh Guardian, 26th July 1919

Peace Day in Nenagh.

NO CELEBRATIONS—BUSINESS AS USUAL 

Mass for the Fallen.

As announced in our late edition last week, the Peace Holiday was not observed in Nenagh on Saturday. With the exception of the Banks, solicitors' offices, Post Office and one auctioneer's office, all the houses were opened, and business was transacted as usual. From about a dozen houses mainly in Castle Street and Summerhill British and French flags were suspended, and as happened on Armistice Day but little recognition was accorded to the valiant efforts of the Great Republic of the West which helped in no small manner to bring victory to the allied armies. In all only two small American emblems were displayed as against the large and costly Union Jacks and French Tri-colours. While this may have been unintentional, we have heard it commented on by many, and the question is asked was the distinction made because of the American demand for Irish Freedom.

Beyond sports at the Military Barracks and a concert there in the afternoon, there were no celebrations and by the people generally but little interest was taken in Peace Day. With Ireland denied the right of self determination, five popular societies in the county proclaimed, and the district full of police and soldiers to enforce the proclamations, the people of Nenagh in common with the people of every other district in the greater part of the country, failed to see how they could celebrate Peace when there was none, and so there were no celebrations or rejoicings, not because the people desired a continuance of the bloody carnage in Europe, but because a war supposed to be for small nations has ended with Ireland still in chains.

It is rumoured that the local branch of the Federation of Discharged and Demobilised Soldiers had arranged to hold celebrations on Saturday, but at a general meeting of the members held on Friday night these were cancelled. The day passed off quietly and uneventfully.

Exciting Street Incident in Cork and Limerick.

Numerous scuffles between soldiers and civilians took place in Cork on Saturday night, in the course of which the former were roughly handled.

The police conveying to the Bridewell a man arrested for beating a soldier, allege that two revolver shots were discharged at them, but no one was struck. Later a crowd gathered in Princes Street and stoned the police, revolver shots being heard.

A baton charge was ordered, and the police pursued the crowd on to Old George's Streetand then to Parliament street where they halted. Some amongst the crowd challenged the police to come on, saying they had plenty of ammunition, and, following the challenge, more shots rang out. Constable Keogh, or the Bridewell, received a bullet wound in the thigh, and the police immediately fired. It is estimated that between twelve and twenty shots came from the crowd, while the police say they fired only four or five rounds. Earlier in the night an officer was chased in Patrick Street, and had to seek refuge in a neighbouring hotel. Some disturbance took place in Limerick on Saturday night owing to disputes between soldiers and civilians. An attempt was made by youths to recover flags displayed on the Junior Club in O'Connell at, and from the drawing-room window of a jeweller's shop in the same thoroughfare. Stones were thrown by members of the crowd, glass broken at the club and the jeweller's shop. A force of Constabulary arrived, and the stone-throwing continuing they charged the crowd with batons drawn into Patrick street. In the Custom House and three other establishments glass was broken. The Constabulary state that stones were thrown at them and one sergeant was struck on the neck with a bottle. Eventually the Constabulary dispersed the crowd, but made no arrests. Several civilians were treated at Barrington’s Hospital for scalp wounds, but none of the injuries was serious.

It was stated that some soldiers of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers were assaulted. Whien the occurrence was reported at New Barracks about 100 men, under Colonel Filgate, turned out, but the Constabulary had then quieted the disturbances. Some military tanks returning to wracks in the dark ran against an electric lamp-post, smashing it.